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Personal Injury Newsletters

Negligence Per Se

Ordinarily, a jury determines whether a defendant was negligent in a personal injury action. However, in some cases, a court may determine that a defendant was “negligent per se.” If a court determines that a defendant is guilty of negligence per se, then the defendant’s negligence is conclusively established and the plaintiff is not required to offer further evidence of the defendant’s negligence.

Recovery by Guest in Automobile Cases

A “guest” in an automobile is a person who rides in an automobile driven by another person for his own pleasure or business without paying the driver or conferring any benefit on him. If the guest is injured while riding in the driver’s automobile, he may be permitted to recover for any injuries that he suffers. His recovery will depend on whether or not a “guest statute” applies in the jurisdiction.

The Collateral Source Rule

The “collateral source rule” is a legal rule that prevents a defendant from introducing evidence that a plaintiff has received payment from a third party. For example, a plaintiff is injured in an automobile accident with a defendant.

The Tort Definition Debate

Apart from legislation granting a right to sue for a specific harm, personal injury law generally consists of tort law and the civil procedure for enforcing it. Although tort law is a major kind of law, among many legal scholars there is no generally agreed definition of the word “tort.” This article discusses the tort definition debate.

Transferred Intent

In order to prove an intentional tort, such as assault or battery, a plaintiff must show that a defendant intended to commit the tort. Under the doctrine of transferred intent, a defendant’s intent to commit a tort against one person may be transferred to another person.